Three girls in resistance. Hannie Schaft and the Oversteegen sisters

Three girls in resistance. Hannie Schaft and the Oversteegen sisters tells the story of three remarkable women, who took up armed resistance. Open: April 18 2008 - February 8 2009.

Armed resistance
Many people are familiar with the name Hannie Schaft, ‘the girl with the red hair’ who was executed by the Germans because of her resistance activities during World War Two. Few people know the names of Truus and Freddie Oversteegen, the sisters with whom Hannie worked closely in the resistance movement. These three young women - Hannie, Truus and Freddie – chose the path of armed resistance. Three girls in resistance. Hannie Schaft and the Oversteegen sisters tells the story of three remarkable women.

Young women took up arms
Most of the people involved in armed resistance were men. Women in the resistance movement generally looked after people in hiding or delivered messages as couriers. Very few women took up arms. But what made these girls do just that and what was it like for serious Hannie, bold Truus and Freddie, who was very young at the time?


After the war
After the war, Hannie became an undisputed resistance heroine, Truus became a sculptress who used her experiences in the resistance as a theme in her work. Freddie lived a quiet and retired life and was disappointed. Both sisters stood behind their choice. But not without mixed feelings.

The exhibition is a production of the Dutch Resistance Museum in collaboration with the National Hannie Schaft-memorial Foundation.

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